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Sports Update: Matt Kemp Back + Brotato Aaron Feld

My sports posts won’t be normal because I am not a sports writer, I am not a statistician, but I am a fan so you’ll get what you get!

Baseball season is currently underway and my Dodgers aren’t doing that great. We’re coming off a game seven, World Series loss that was hard to stomach even if it was a fun and LONG series and we were killing it last season. So this year we were expected to do much of the same, KILL IT and possibly bring a World Series win back to Chavez Ravine – it’s not looking that way.

Before the season even started we lost one of our best players, who I believe is the heart of the team, Justin Turner after he suffered a broken wrist when he was hit by a pitch in a spring training game. LAME. Then when the season started we just didn’t look like the 2017 Dodgers. Kershaw was still a pitching machine, but our offense wasn’t helping him out. Then we got news that Seager was suffering from a UCL sprain in his right elbow and was going to be missing the rest of the season so he could have Tommy John Surgery. If that wasn’t bad, days later it was announced that our ace, Clayton Kershaw was being placed on the 10 day DL with left bicep tendonitis. To say the 2018 season has been frustrating is an understatement.

But I am a New Day follower so I am trying to focus on the power of positivity, that being Matt Kemp. We were reunited with Kemp after a five player trade with the Atlanta Braves during the off season. After Matt Kemp fizzled his first time with LA a lot of fans weren’t happy about his return. I on the other hand was kind of excited, I was mad we lost Culberson in this trade, but after I read “The Resurgence of Matt Kemp” from Bleacher Report, I remained hopeful.

I was right to be positive because Matt Kemp is doing good! Please don’t jinx, please don’t jinx.

As of right now Kemp has a .313 batting average with .350 OBP, .500 Slugging Average and a .850 OPS. Yay stats! In normal person speak that means dudes LIT AF. He’s played 42 games,134 AB, 13 Runs, 42 Hits, 20 RBIs, and 5 Dingers. In fact as I write this Kemp had a game winning double in the 9th after a double header with the Nationals. BOOM.

Added bonus? Matt Kemp is a fucking full on babe.

My other sports obsession? Aaron Feld the Strength and Conditioning Coach that the Ducks got this year. Aaron Feld is a full on broseph with a old timey mustache and possess’ the energy that DJ Khaled would have if he ate pussy.

After the snake Willie Taggart ditched the Ducks for a head coaching job at FSU they’ve been trying to rebrand and I think Aaron Feld is just what the doctor ordered. Aaron Feld’s videos on Twitter make me wish I was a yoked out bro with sick abs. Young dudes will love his energy and they have sick workouts brah.

Added bonus? Aaron Feld is a babe, even with that mustache.

😏pic.twitter.com/D7Co8IIRUD

— Aaron Feld (@coachfeld) March 23, 2018

The post Sports Update: Matt Kemp Back + Brotato Aaron Feld appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

Sports Update: Matt Kemp Back + Brotato Aaron Feld

My sports posts won’t be normal because I am not a sports writer, I am not a statistician, but I am a fan so you’ll get what you get!

Baseball season is currently underway and my Dodgers aren’t doing that great. We’re coming off a game seven, World Series loss that was hard to stomach even if it was a fun and LONG series and we were killing it last season. So this year we were expected to do much of the same, KILL IT and possibly bring a World Series win back to Chavez Ravine – it’s not looking that way.

Before the season even started we lost one of our best players, who I believe is the heart of the team, Justin Turner after he suffered a broken wrist when he was hit by a pitch in a spring training game. LAME. Then when the season started we just didn’t look like the 2017 Dodgers. Kershaw was still a pitching machine, but our offense wasn’t helping him out. Then we got news that Seager was suffering from a UCL sprain in his right elbow and was going to be missing the rest of the season so he could have Tommy John Surgery. If that wasn’t bad, days later it was announced that our ace, Clayton Kershaw was being placed on the 10 day DL with left bicep tendonitis. To say the 2018 season has been frustrating is an understatement.

But I am a New Day follower so I am trying to focus on the power of positivity, that being Matt Kemp. We were reunited with Kemp after a five player trade with the Atlanta Braves during the off season. After Matt Kemp fizzled his first time with LA a lot of fans weren’t happy about his return. I on the other hand was kind of excited, I was mad we lost Culberson in this trade, but after I read “The Resurgence of Matt Kemp” from Bleacher Report, I remained hopeful.

I was right to be positive because Matt Kemp is doing good! Please don’t jinx, please don’t jinx.

As of right now Kemp has a .313 batting average with .350 OBP, .500 Slugging Average and a .850 OPS. Yay stats! In normal person speak that means dudes LIT AF. He’s played 42 games,134 AB, 13 Runs, 42 Hits, 20 RBIs, and 5 Dingers. In fact as I write this Kemp had a game winning double in the 9th after a double header with the Nationals. BOOM.

Added bonus? Matt Kemp is a fucking full on babe.

My other sports obsession? Aaron Feld the Strength and Conditioning Coach that the Ducks got this year. Aaron Feld is a full on broseph with a old timey mustache and possess’ the energy that DJ Khaled would have if he ate pussy.

After the snake Willie Taggart ditched the Ducks for a head coaching job at FSU they’ve been trying to rebrand and I think Aaron Feld is just what the doctor ordered. Aaron Feld’s videos on Twitter make me wish I was a yoked out bro with sick abs. Young dudes will love his energy and they have sick workouts brah.

Added bonus? Aaron Feld is a babe, even with that mustache.

😏pic.twitter.com/D7Co8IIRUD

— Aaron Feld (@coachfeld) March 23, 2018

The post Sports Update: Matt Kemp Back + Brotato Aaron Feld appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

Royal Wedding Weed Memes

The Royal Wedding was this weekend and everyone was so excited to watch Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to say “I do”. Most of the globe was tuned in, but I couldn’t stomach waking up that early, so I caught up via social media.

Meghan looked beautiful and Harry was his handsome self. Isn’t it funny how years ago we all wanted William, but then he lost his hair and Harry turned into this fun ginger-stud that every woman from here to merry old England fantasizes about? Well sorry ladies, Meghan Markle put in work, secured her spot and now we all have to watch in envy.

Anyway, I made some dumb weed memes!

The post Royal Wedding Weed Memes appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

Strain Review: Truffle Butter From Freddy’s Fuego

Lets go over Truffle Butter from Freddy’s Fuego.

There are three reasons I chose to go with Freddy’s Fuego: 1 – I loved their branding! From the logo to the glass jar, they just stood out to me. I prefer to get my bud in the jars versus the plastic baggies because it just shows that the grower cares more about how their product is being perceived by the consumer. With that being said, I understand that some growers don’t use jars if you’re buying in smaller quantities because it’s not cost effective. 2 – My dad’s nickname is Freddy and that also played a part in why I purchased an eighth of this lovely strain. I even sent him a pic, to which he replied “I need that!”. 3 – The song “Truffle Butter” immediately started playing in my head so I had to have it.

Truffle Butter is crossed with Gelato and Chocolate Kush, the grower has it labeled as a Hybrid, but you’ll notice that Leafly has it categorized as an indica. The categorization doesn’t really matter, but I wanted to put it out there in case anyone noticed and had anything to say about it.

Aside from awesome branding the chunky, purple nugs with specks of green that looked as if they had been sandblasted with sugar crystals and amber hairs were calling me! The scent was sweet with berry hints and buttery notes.

This wasn’t physically energetic, but I was mentally stimulated and YES the “Truffle Butter” song was stuck in my head. After I first smoked this stuff I was somehow tagged in some Twitter feud between some bible thumper and a cannabis follower of mine. It didn’t bother me that she was so against cannabis and drinking, I just kept egging her on and dying of laughter. So I guess you could say that Truffle Butter is basically a shield for bullshit that keeps you smiling all the way through it.

The post Strain Review: Truffle Butter From Freddy’s Fuego appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

What I’m Listening To: Cardi B, Janelle Monae, Rae Sremmurd

Okay, so for whatever reason I wanted to try and do weekly playlists, but that’s just too difficult because I don’t keep up with new music much these days. I’ve reached that point in life where you kind of stop and just listen to talk radio.

So I am going to just let you know what I’m listening to and you can listen and maybe explore more of the artists catalog.

GET IT? GOT IT? GOOD!

So Cardi B has had one of the biggest glow ups I’ve ever been witness to. A Bronx native, Dominicana who started as a stripper then became Instagram famous and hustled that into a role on VH1’s Love & Hip Hop. From there she turned her short run on the show as a platform to take over the rap game. I first heard about Cardi from people I follow on Twitter who keep me in the know, but I never watched the show or knew of her Instagram notoriety. I fell in love with her through clips of her on the show, then started going through her mixtapes.

Cardi B is unapologetic about who she is and where she comes from. Shit like that should be admired, but instead a lot of people rag on her. People call her “ghetto” and “uneducated” because of the way she speaks. A sister of mine tagged another in a meme on FB that said “Cardi B makes music for women who think that talking louder is winning an argument”, you’ve probably seen it. When I see shit like that I roll my eyes so fucking hard because Cardi B makes music for women who are constantly marginalized because of the communities they come from and who are often underrepresented because of the way they look. She makes music to empower these women to show them that shit like that doesn’t matter. Believe in you, secure the bag and fuck the haters.

Look at the stats. Chart topping music, millions of followers, multiple features with other chart toppers, killed her SNL performance, killed her Coachella set by channeling Left Eye, while pregnant AND twerking in the fucking desert..Met Gala in couture. AND SHE WAS BLESSED BY QUEEN B.

BARDI GANG BITCH! “Got a bag and fixed my teeth, hope you hoes know that ain’t cheap”.

Her album Invasion of Privacy is so fucking dope! I listened to it the day after it dropped, in the San Francisco Airport on a flight delay, high off my ass. I shit you not when I tell you I almost cried listening to it. IT IS EMOTIONAL, RAW AND BET SHE HAS MORE IN STORE. My favorite track is “Be Careful”, but her whole album is a mood and will be my Summer staple. Sunroof open. It’s not a threat, it’s a warning.

A few years back I had the chance to see Janelle Monae live. I’m not lying when I say it was a life changing moment. I became a fan, or stan as all the cool people say. Since then she hadn’t really put out new music until a couple weeks ago when her Dirty Computer album was released…with a short film attached to it that premiered the night before. Before that she released a couple videos that are part of the short film and I was just salivating because to me she is one of the most creative and revolutionary performers we have right now. She’s a mix of Prince, Bowie and hints of James Brown.

Janelle Monae has been having an exciting career to watch blossom. Grammys, Oscars, scene stealing performances, she’s doing it all and killing every aspect of her careers. She’s smart, eloquent, thought provoking and her recent coming out as being pansexual is something we should all be praising.

I get to see her in a few weeks at McMenamins Edgefield as part of their Summer Concert series and I am so fucking excited!! I hope her muse Tessa Thompson is there

What can I say about Rae Sremmurd? Well their name spells Ear Drummers backwards, but I don’t really know anything about the duo. I just learned they were brothers and that they’re Cali natives. But none of that matters because I have fucked with each of their albums that have been released.

I’ve been rocking their latest album trilogy, SR3MM which has one album that features the two, then they each get their own album that’s tailored to their individual styles. Similar to what Outkast did back when they released Speakerboxxx/The Love Below.

Each of their albums has so many ear worms: Black Beatles, my all time favorite Throw Sum Mo with Nicki and Thugger, and No Flex Zone.

There you go, three awesome albums that you should check out.

The post What I’m Listening To: Cardi B, Janelle Monae, Rae Sremmurd appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

U.S. Attorney: Oregon has a major marijuana overproduction issue

PORTLAND — The black market for marijuana is thriving in Oregon and an oversupply of weed from growers is flowing to more than two dozen states where pot remains illegal, a top federal law enforcement official said Friday.

U.S. Attorney Billy Williams said the state has a “significant overproduction” problem and that he would prioritize enforcement of overproduction, interstate trafficking, organized crime and cases involving underage marijuana use and environmental damage from illicit pot farms.

The comments, which echoed those he made earlier this year, were included in a memo that outlines his plans for enforcing federal drug laws in a state with legalized marijuana. Williams is the first U.S. attorney to issue such guidance after Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the Obama administration’s guidance on pot-friendly states in January.

“As the primary law enforcement official in Oregon, I will not make broad proclamations of blanket immunity from prosecution to those who violate federal law,” he wrote.

Sessions asked federal prosecutors to determine marijuana policies for their districts, prompting Williams to convene a summit in Portland earlier this year to discuss the state’s oversupply problem. At the time, Williams also penned an editorial that described a glut of marijuana making its way out of the state illegally and called for action by local and state leaders.

Those in the marijuana industry reacted with cautious optimism to the memo and said it didn’t seem to change federal marijuana policy in Oregon.

The state currently has nearly 1 million pounds of marijuana flower in inventory, a staggering amount for a state with a population of 4.1 million people. That doesn’t include 350,000 pounds of marijuana edibles, tinctures and concentrates.

The retail price for a gram of pot has fallen about 50 percent since 2015, from $14 to $7, according to a report by the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. Legal growers and retailers alike have felt the sting.

The true amount of marijuana leaving the state is hard to pin down, said Beau Whitney, a senior economist at New Frontier Data, a national cannabis analytics firm.

The state has 21 million square feet of legal marijuana growing and a $1 billion market statewide, he said. Of that, about one-third — or about $300 million — is diverted to the illegal market within the state, but it is not clear how much is leaving Oregon, he added.

The amount being grown legally is “more than enough to handle all of the demand in Oregon and so to me, it’s no wonder that there’s excess supply in the space. What people choose to do with it, it’s tough to estimate,” Whitney said.

“They’re saying, ‘If you’re exporting, then we’re going to come down on you.’”

To that end, Williams said Oregon needs to do a better job at gathering data about the marijuana industry and devote more resources to enforcement and oversight. Federal prosecutors have finite resources in Oregon, he wrote, and they will “strategically consider” which cases to pursue, in some cases favoring asset forfeiture and other civil punishments over criminal prosecutions.

Entrepreneurs who have successfully navigated the oversupplied market said they hoped Williams’ approach wouldn’t jeopardize their state-legal businesses. William Simpson, founder of Chalice, will soon open his seventh retail store in Oregon and is hoping to expand into California, Nevada and Canada.

“I’m fearful with this oversupply it basically puts a lot of people in a desperate situation … and it forces them to do illegal things. What that’s going to do is bring a microscope by the federal government over the state of Oregon,” he said.

“It can put the whole thing in danger. I think we’re past that point, but we definitely don’t want to give them a reason to rethink that.”

Marijuana growers turning to hemp as market for CBD explodes

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. — A glut of legal marijuana is driving Oregon pot prices to rock-bottom levels, prompting some nervous growers to start pivoting to another type of cannabis to make ends meet — one that doesn’t come with a high.

Applications for state licenses to grow hemp — marijuana’s non-intoxicating cousin — have increased more than twentyfold since 2015, making Oregon No. 2 behind Colorado among the 19 states with active hemp cultivation. The rapidly evolving market comes amid skyrocketing demand for a hemp-derived extract called cannabidiol, or CBD, seen by many as a health aid.

In its purified distilled form, CBD oil commands thousands of dollars per kilogram, and farmers can make more than $100,000 an acre growing hemp plants to produce it. That distillate can also be converted into a crystallized form or powder.

“Word on the street is everybody thinks hemp’s the new gold rush,” Jerrad McCord said, who grows marijuana in southern Oregon and recently added 12 acres of hemp. “This is a business. You’ve got to adapt, and you’ve got to be a problem-solver.”

It’s a problem few predicted when Oregon voters opened the door to legal marijuana four years ago.

The state’s climate is perfect for growing marijuana, and growers produced bumper crops. Under state law, none can leave Oregon. That, coupled with a decision to not cap the number of licenses for growers, has created a surplus.

Oregon’s inventory of marijuana is staggering for a state its size. There are nearly 1 million pounds of usable flower in the system, and an additional 350,000 pounds of marijuana extracts, edibles and tinctures.

“Usable flower” refers to the dried marijuana flower — or bud — that is most commonly associated with marijuana consumption.

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission, which regulates the industry, says some of the inventory of flower goes into extracts, oils and tinctures — which have increased in popularity — but the agency can’t say how much. A comprehensive market study is underway.

Yet the retail price for a gram of pot has fallen about 50 percent since 2015, from $14 to $7, according to a report by the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. Growers and retailers alike have felt the sting.

“Now we’re starting to look at drastic means, like destroying product. At some point, there’s no more storage for it,” Trey Willison said, who switched his operation from marijuana to hemp this season. “Whoever would have thought we’d get to the point of destroying pounds of marijuana?”

That stark prospect is driving more of Oregon’s marijuana entrepreneurs toward hemp, a crop that already has a foothold in states like Colorado and Kentucky and a lot of buzz in the cannabis industry. In Oregon, the number of hemp licenses increased from 12 in 2015 to 353 as of last week.

Colorado and Washington were the first states to broadly legalize marijuana. Both have seen price drops for marijuana but not as significant as Oregon.

Like marijuana, the hemp plant is a cannabis plant, but it contains less than 0.3 percent of THC, the compound that gives pot its high. Growing industrial hemp is legal under federal law, and the plant can be sold for use in things like fabric, food, seed and building materials.

But the increasing focus in Oregon is the gold-colored CBD oil that has soared in popularity among cannabis connoisseurs and is rapidly going mainstream. At least 50 percent of hemp nationwide is being grown for CBD extraction, and Oregon is riding the crest of that wave, Eric Steenstra said, president of Vote Hemp, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for pro-hemp legislation.

“There are a lot of growers who already have experience growing cannabis, and when you’re growing for CBD, there are a lot of the same techniques that you use for growing marijuana,” he said. “Oregon is definitely a hotbed of activity around this.”

CBD is popping up in everything from cosmetics to chocolate bars to bottled water to pet treats. One Los Angeles bar sells drinks containing the oil, massage therapists use creams containing CBD and juice bars offer the stuff in smoothies. Dozens of online sites sell endless iterations of CBD oils, tinctures, capsules, transdermal patches, infused chocolates and creams with no oversight.

Proponents say CBD offers a plethora of health benefits, from relieving pain to taming anxiety. Scientists caution, however, that there have been few comprehensive clinical studies of how CBD affects humans — mostly because the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration still considers cannabidiol extract off-limits, and the government requires special dispensation to study it.

Pre-clinical studies have shown promise for treatment of chronic pain, neuro-inflammation, anxiety, addiction and anti-psychotic effects in animals, mostly rodents, Ziva Cooper said, an associate professor of clinical neurobiology at Columbia University who focuses her research on the therapeutic potential of cannabis and cannabinoids.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration next month could approve the first drug derived from CBD. It’s used to treat forms of epilepsy.

Christina Sasser, co-founder of Vital Leaf, isn’t waiting for government action to market CBD products in stores and online. She sells about 500 bottles of Oregon-sourced CBD oil a month and ships only to customers living in states with state-run hemp pilot programs, to better avoid the possibility of legal trouble.

“Everybody in the CBD world has recognized the risks involved, and I would say the vast majority of us really believe in the power of the plant and are willing to operate in this, sort of, gray area,” she said.

Willison was selling marijuana clones to pot startups when he realized last spring he was selling way more clones than Oregon’s market could support. The two-story building where he grew 200 pounds of weed a month sits nearly empty, and a greenhouse built to expand his pot business is packed with hemp plants instead.

He breeds hemp plants genetically selected for their strong CBD concentration, harvests the seeds and extracts CBD from the remaining plants that can fetch up to $13,000 per kilogram. His future looks bright again.

“The (marijuana) market is stuck within the borders of Oregon — it’s locked within the state,” he said, as he took a break from collecting tiny grains of pollen from his plants. “But hemp is an international commodity now.”

Dietitian’s guide to edible cannabis edibles, extracts

Cannabis is making its way into more and more foods and beverages, thanks to its touted therapeutic benefits. In fact, no matter where you are in the United States, cannabis products are probably being sold in your grocery store — and it’s perfectly legal. Because regulation hasn’t kept up, this should be cause for concern no matter your politics. But before we go further, let me define what I mean when I say cannabis.

Cannabis is a plant that has been selectively bred into two distinct varieties: Hemp for its fiber and nutritious seeds; and marijuana for its medical and recreational uses.

Cannabis contains numerous compounds called cannabinoids. The most well-known cannabinoid, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, causes the high many people associate with cannabis. Marijuana plants have been selectively bred to have a lot of THC.

Hemp products contain either minuscule levels or no THC at all. Hempseeds and the oil made from the seeds are already in grocery stores nationwide as food items or ingredients. Hempseeds are rich in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 gamma-linolenic acid and other nutrients that contain trace or no THC. Consuming hempseeds or hemp oil doesn’t cause a high and won’t cause you to fail a drug test.

But there is another cannabis compound gaining popularity called cannabidiol, or CBD, which can be found in either marijuana or hemp. It doesn’t have mind-altering effects and may offer therapeutic benefits. In states where they’re legal, CBD from hemp, and both CBD and THC from marijuana, are starting to appear in products such as specialty ice cream, snack bars, beer and cold-brew coffee. This isn’t limited to dispensaries; some grocery stores are selling CBD oil.

As a dietitian, I never thought that cannabis would be a topic within my wheelhouse. But more clients are asking about it, and, before looking into it, I wasn’t clear on when it’s considered a food, drug or medicine. Here’s what I can tell you.

• Potential benefits of cannabis: According to a 2017 report by the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, there is substantial evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids are effective for treating chronic pain, multiple sclerosis spasticity symptoms, and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

Initial studies show that CBD oil may be helpful for children with epilepsy, and it is being investigated as a potential treatment for other neurological disorders and mental health and substance abuse issues. CBD oil, THC and marijuana have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration “for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of any disease.” Medications that contain synthetic THC or similar compounds, however, have been approved by the FDA for specific uses.

• Buyer beware: What should consumers know about THC or CBD in food or as extracts? Note that because marijuana and some hemp products are federally illegal, oversight falls to the states. But label laws and quality control differ among states, and, the FDA warns, the amounts of THC and CBD listed on a package aren’t necessarily precise. As a result, consumers can’t accurately estimate the dosage they’re getting. This is a safety concern and is especially worrisome for people who are using these products to try to treat medical conditions.

“The market is unregulated and there are entities marketing less-than-safe and inauthentic products,” warns Colleen Keahey Lanier, executive director of the Hemp Industries Association.

While I don’t advocate that anyone ingest substances whose benefits are not well studied and may be illegal, there are steps you can take to protect yourself if you do decide to try cannabis products. Keahey Lanier offers the following tips to consumers looking for CBD oil: “Look for brands that offer third-party batch testing not only for the cannabinoid content but also for heavy metals and residual solvents. Stay away from synthetic cannabinoids like 5-fluoro ADB, which may be purposefully mis-marketed as an organic hemp-derived product.”

Janice Newell Bissex, a dietitian and holistic cannabis practitioner, recommends her clients take a look at where the product was grown and encourages choosing a whole plant product rather than just an extract of THC or CBD. For example, some whole products contain terpenes, compounds that may have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial effects and anxiety-reducing effects.

With tinctures and products that contain THC, be aware that ingesting the compound means delayed results. This increases the chances that people will consume too much.

There are also concerns about children accidentally ingesting marijuana in foods and beverages, especially in baked goods and candy, although the numbers have been small so far.

Main Street Marijuana keeps growing

Main Street Marijuana is expanding its downtown and east Vancouver locations, steps that co-owner Ramsey Hamide hopes will make room for faster sales.

The downtown location, at 2314 Main St., is now expanding into the neighboring storefront that formerly housed the antique store Uptown Attic. The move adds 2,000 square feet to the shop.

Meanwhile, the east Vancouver location at 16219 S.E. 12th St. will take over a 3,400-square-foot storefront on the floor above.

Hamide said the expansions will enable the stores to grow their showrooms while increasing the size of storage spaces and employee rest areas. The stores have more than 90 workers between them, he said.

“Both (store locations) have continued to grow,” he said. The two locations are the first and sixth top-selling marijuana retailers in Washington, combining for just more than $2 million in sales in February, according to the marijuana industry tracking website 502data.com.

Hamide, who owns the store with his brother Adam, said the key is getting shoppers what they need as quickly as possible. Marijuana flower continues to get cheaper, so adding extra space will help them add staff and process sales more quickly.

“If you look at revenues, it actually looks kind of flat. You’re not seeing that behind the scenes prices have fallen substantially, so to get that same (sales) we have to move a lot more units,” he said.

Marijuana flower, the most popular recreational marijuana product available, retails at less than $7 per gram on average, including excise tax, according to representatives from the state Liquor and Cannabis Board.

“It’s a matter of supply and demand, and there’s plenty of supply,” said Brian Smith, spokesman for the agency.

The new space and some additional parking helps alleviate two big problems for the Uptown Village location. Last August, Hamide said it was possible the business would relocate because of the space shortage and challenges with parking.

Main Street Marijuana has a third location in Longview that was recently remodeled, as well.

University to test if chemical in pot aids kids with autism

UC San Diego will try to alleviate severe autism in children by giving them a nonpsychoactive chemical found in marijuana, a project funded by the biggest private donation ever made in the U.S. for such research.

The $4.7 million study involves the controversial compound cannabidiol, or CBD, which is widely marketed nationwide as something of a miracle drug, capable of treating everything from cancer to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Regulators believe CBD does show therapeutic promise. But they also say the miracle drug claims are wrong or based on anecdotes rather than scientific evidence. Last fall, the FDA warned four companies to stop saying things like, “CBD makes cancer cells commit ‘suicide.’ ”

UC San Diego dealt with the issue by asking the Ray and Tye Noorda Foundation of Lindon, Utah, for $4.7 million to study whether CBD can ease the most severe symptoms of autism, including seizures, self-injuring behavior, and crippling anxiety.

The foundation agreed, and it is urging the federal government to remove marijuana from its list of Schedule I drugs so that cannabis can be widely studied.

Schedule I drugs are defined as substances and chemicals that have no accepted use in medicine and a high potential for abuse. As a result, the government provides little money to study marijuana.

The listing contradicts the findings of many federal, industry and university scientists who say cannabis appears to be helpful for treating a variety of diseases and disorders, including epilepsy, chronic pain, and the vomiting associated with chemotherapy.

Parents are pressing scientists to expand their research to autism spectrum disorder, a developmental brain disorder that afflicts 3.5 million people in the U.S. Some parents have given CBD to their autistic children, notably in states like California where medical and recreational marijuana are legal.

“I’ve spoken to parents who swear that this is effective — but it needs to undergo scientific research,” said Scott Badesch, president of the Autism Society of America, which is based in Bethesda, Md.

UC San Diego’s Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research will conduct a clinical trial involving 30 autistic children with severe symptoms. The children, who will be recruited from throughout the region, will be given a liquid form of CBD that will be provided by a federally approved laboratory in Arizona.

During the study, which begins next year, the children will also undergo behavioral testing, MRI scans and electroencephalograms. The patients will range in age from 8 to 12.

“It’s important to do this study to show whether there is objective improvement, or whether (CBD) is detrimental or whether it doesn’t do anything at all,” said Dr. Doris Trauner, the UC San Diego pediatrics and neuroscience expert who will lead this aspect of the study.

Determine safety

The university says the overall project, led by Dr. Igor Grant, “will determine if CBD is safe and tolerable and whether it alleviates adverse symptoms of ASD; determine whether and how CBD alters brain activity, neurotransmitters and/or brain network connectivity; and determine whether biomarkers or neuroinflammation are altered by CBD.”

The $4.7 million that the Noorda Foundation is giving for the study represents the latest effort by the group to promote public health and welfare. Noorda has donated money for everything from higher education to youth services to hospitals.

Noorda is partnering on its support to UC San Diego with the Wholistic Research and Education Foundation, a La Jolla-based group that promotes research and education about medical marijuana, particularly CBD.

The foundation is run by Andy Noorda and Pelin Thorogood, who said in a joint email to the Union-Tribune that, “CBD has its controversies as there are companies that make unproven health claims, and their products may not even contain the ingredients or concentrations they advertise.

“The federal designation of cannabis as a Schedule I drug is one of the primary enablers of this problem. Unlike other substances whose use may increase risk or lead to abuse, such as alcohol or tobacco, currently there are no set standards for manufactures. Nor are there clear guidelines for the public as they make choices regarding if, when, and how to use cannabis safely for therapeutic purposes.

“Our goal is to change this paradigm with research-driven, scientific data, while also supporting the establishment of standardized testing and regulation to ensure that available products are indeed what they claim to be.”